Barracuda caught in Vancouver Island waters

A Vancouver Fisherman found a barracuda in his net while fishing in the Alberni Inlet earlier this week||Photo Courtesy of Tyler Vogrig


Tyler Hay

@_hay_tyler


A Vancouver fisherman got a rare experience earlier this week while fishing in the Alberni Inlet. Tyler Vogrig was fishing for salmon with his dad on their boat, Nita Maria, when seals chased a 12-pound barracuda into their net.

“It was just something completely out of the ordinary and I really think it’s definitely a one-in-a-million,” said Vogrig. He added he is used to fishing for barracuda when vacationing in Hawaii, but has never seen them in Canada

The first barracuda collected in BC waters was in Sooke in 1904, according to the Royal BC Museum database. This is the only barracuda in the museum’s collection, though there have been sightings since.

“They Have been documented as far North as the Gulf of Alaska, but are typically most abundant on the Californian coast, where they are a popular sport fish. Not unheard of here, but certainly unusual,” said Justin Lisaingo, senior aquarium biologist at the Vancouver Aquarium. He said the fish could have followed warm ocean currents and wound up farther north than it expected.

The Pacific Barracuda, according to marinebio.org, rarely grows larger than 10 pounds And 1.2 metres. It has a reputation for being a voracious hunter and is feared by some swimmers, though attacks on humans are rare.

After consulting with Fisheries Canada, taking a few photos and letting the metre-long fish recover in a revival tank, Vogrig was told it was OK to release it back into the water.

“Seeing predominantly southern ranging species in BC waters is always an interesting story and a good reminder of how much our marine environments are changing,” said Laura Borden, Howe Sound research group manager at the Vancouver Aquarium.

A barracuda was caught and released in the Alberni Inlet earlier this week, after consultation with Fisheries Canada|| Photo courtesy of Tyler Vogrig

11 thoughts on “Barracuda caught in Vancouver Island waters

    1. Nowhere in the article did it state “they aren’t found here”, but did state a number of times they are uncommon here…

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  1. man made climate change is fake, the world is always changing. there has been times of much higher Co2 and oxygen %% in the air, there has been times of much warmer and much colder average temperatures. hell a billion years ago the rockey mountains where under the ocean!

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  2. This is cool and a very rare catch,
    But their has been warm ocean currents before. Their has been other sittings of other species of fish in the Vancouver island area for years,that have been reported etc
    A barracuda is the first I have heard of. Their have been shark sittings in the past and that has been reported .
    This is a normal natural condition that has happened since I can remember.
    The Pacific Ocean is huge and the current is always moving and fish move with the currents that’s just a fact.
    Congratulations on your catch!!

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  3. This is cool and a very rare catch,
    But their has been warm ocean currents before. Their has been other sittings of other species of fish in the Vancouver island area for years,that have been reported etc
    A barracuda is the first I have heard of. Their have been shark sittings in the past and that has been reported .
    This is a normal natural condition that has happened since I can remember.
    The Pacific Ocean is huge and the current is always moving and fish move with the currents that’s just a fact.
    Congratulations on your catch!!

    Like

  4. That is a good size one too. Even by California standards that would be considered a large cuda. It is only fair that some of the fish that reside in Southern California waters make their way up into your area. Since lucky anglers in Southern California have been known to catch a Chinook while targeting other species. It doesn’t happen often but it does happen.

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